Non-Invasive means "NO MORE CUTTING": Welcome to the age of the TRICORDER


Early 60's pop culture represented a caricature of our western medical science as appears in the adventure board game called "OPERATION".  It simulated a nerve-racking surgical malpractice scenario with the naked Cavity Sam's many exposed plastic vital organs.  And then there's the ever-popular Star Trek line of accessories like Dr. "Bones" McCoy's Medical TRICORDER - an innovative marvel that projected a non-invasive medical future.  

I recently reunited with these toys in my attic as part of a spring cleaning frenzy.  Juxtaposed, they illustrated the notable evolution in our philosophy behind patient care.

"Trekkies" (like me) grew up to witness a vast line of creative concepts about a probable future come to real life.  Tools such as the personal computer, the food replicator, the 3D printer, the cell phone, the tractor beam, laser technology, holograms and yes, the Medical TRICORDER! Once creations of theatrical prop-mastery from a campy sci-fi show predicted and undoubtedly inspired true scientific innovations that helped shape our technology age of today. 

THE "4-D" DOPPLER SCANNER:
Non-Invasive Targeting of Surgical Complications
Recently, a good friend got into a little car trouble and rang me up  to ask for a lift to his radiologist in NYC.  This visit opened my eyes to an entire world of innovation that would otherwise go unnoticed if not for the consult with Dr. Robert Bard.  This man sounded like the real deal when it comes to finding foreign bodies and anomalies under the skin- outperforming X-rays, CT scans or MRI's. His 4D system (and his expertise) gives the patient a comprehensive report in complete real-time motion viewing from all dimensions and depths of the injured area.  His ability to study an area's blood flow gives much better information on the causes and direction of inflammation, growths, micro-fractures and tumors.

He had a small waiting room of about 10 seats but what was unusual was how fast everyone came and went.  (I recall having an MRI and it took hours). It was then that I discovered what was behind the curtain;  he had a high-powered Sonogram that could scan just about anything on a near-cellular level.  From prostate and breast tumors, to cardiac and circulation issues, to the smallest splinter lodged under someone's skin-- Dr. Bard can target things with his machines so accurately in just a matter of minutes!


... Remember the TRICORDER?

Think about Dr. McCoy waving that little scanning wand over a patient and getting all sorts of data on their maladies in a matter of seconds... that's pretty much what you have with Dr. Bard's equipment.  My friend was here for a PRE-OP scan of his hand injured from a car accident.  Prior to undergoing a surgical procedure to repair torn ligaments, he was prescribed a digital scan to check for any potential issues under the skin.  Sure enough, Dr. Bard found broken glass, frayed nerves, unusual clots and damaged tendons—things not shown on the x-ray that would have created complications in surgery.  Bard calls these things "land mines" associating them to hidden, unexpected problems in what would start out as a “routine” operative repair. Digital 4-D Pre-Op imaging alerted the surgeon to the new issues and specialists were called in to support the more complicated procedure.


After he drew up the full report, we had a lengthier chat about how important this process has become.  He has volumes of stories of "found treasures" under the skin that might have gone unnoticed if not for his process.  His focus is typically reading cancerous tumors where he can monitor the blood flow in real time to determine malignancy.  But he says that lately, more and more surgeons are calling to have access to his uniquely innovative technology.  


Ref: www.BardCancerDiagnostics.com

................................................................................................................................................................


Dr. Michael W Freckleton
(Brooks Air Force Base, TX)
uses Terason 2000 with
a Head-Mount Display
TELEMEDICINE
Dr. Bard is just one of a growing population of medical professionals who are in mad pursuit of "future-tech" and a safer yet more performance-driven innovations.  My continued research uncovered just how much science has truly advanced in the ways of diagnostic and non-invasive technology.  A common search term for this is called 'telemedicine'- manufactured by a handful of giants in the field including an MIT-based company called Terason (a branch of Teratech Corp).  A presentation on their portable ultrasound devices are currently being used for and expanded number of environments including marine vessels and the aeronautics & space travel.  

(Excerpt from press release courtesy of Terason) On September 15, 2016, Terason's technology was chosen as the scanner of choice for the France/China Cardiospace mission to study how astronauts’ cardiovascular system adapted to microgravity conditions.   The new TianGong-2 orbital module was launched from China’s Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, carrying a broader range of devices including Cardiospace, a joint effort of CNES and CMSEO/ACC (China Manned Space Engineering Office/Astronaut Center of China).


Cardiospace is designed to study how the cardiovascular system adapts during human spaceflight. Its results will of course benefit astronaut health but also public health, as cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of mortality worldwide. CNES coordinated development of the instruments making up Cardiospace, in particular Terason’s Doppler laser and ultrasound scanner that will measure micro-circulation and macro-circulation. The intuitive nature of the Terason 3200 system, coupled with the lightweight, small footprint and crystal clear imagery will yield a wealth of science data that could serve to determine new joint space missions for China’s future space station.


(End of Part 1)

Written by: Carmen Regallo-Dewitt exclusively for the PHA Blogsite (c)2018.
Edited by: Laguna el Guapo/Stanley Yip of Rejuvenate! Magazine (http://rejuvenatesolutions.com)
Photo credit: Editorial photo Digitalreflections/Shutterstock (Operation Game from Milton Bradley)
Photo credit: "The Tricorder"- Steve Signorile
Photo credit (4): Terason Doppler laser/ultrasound scanner ..................................................................................................................................................

Special thanks to: 
Dr. Robert Bard (www.barddiagnostics.com)
Alice Chiang, Terason & content contribution by Teratech Corp. (www.terason.com/)
Co-Publisher: Dr. Andrew J. Rochman: (http://andrewjrochman.com)
Editorial Advvisor: John Graziano 
Pain Healers Alliance Blog / Modern Pain Relief (www.modernpainrelief.com)
Technical Advisor 1: Dr. Jesse A. Stoff  (http://whoisdrjessestoff.com)
Technical Advisor 2: Beth "Laser Goddess" Christenson (https://lasergoddess.com)


References:
"Star Trek Tech Used Today":
http://money.cnn.com/gallery/technology/2015/02/27/leonard-nimoy-dead-spock-star-trek/index.html
"The Top 10 Star Trek Technologies"- https://www.space.com/9705-top-10-star-trek-technologies.html

Text mentions: Star Trek (tm), Dr. "Bones" McCoy and the Medical Tricorder(tm) are registered trademarks of Paramount Pictures Ltd.

Comments

  1. The future of analyzing and greatly improving the ability to look into the human condition is here today. The impossible and improbable a few years ago is amazingly very plausible now. And the potential to learn how much we can better ourselves is truly limitless. I am loving the integration of "future-tech" with human intelligence!
    Dr. Steven M Riess

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  2. Fortunately Dr. Bard had the passion to find a better diagnostic tool for so many people that suffer with chronic pain. I met a patient that had a relentless gnawing pain in her SI joint for years. Two MRI's had not found the the nerve was inflamed. Her ortho and pain management were labeling it as a phantom pain from when she had a terrible accident years ago. Dr. Bards scan detected a very slight compression (intermitent, depending on the activties) causing inflammation in the surrounding tissue and on the nerve. This pain was so disturbing that she left the career she loved and applied for permanent disability. Now her ortho team has something to work with. This pain developed as she aged and developed OA in the areas where she had multiple fractures requiring hardware . This in turn led to premature erosion of her knees which led to a slight contortion of her SI joint. Thank you Dr. Bard for your dedication.

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